Grass is Always Greener with a Drainfield Leak

July 2, 2021

The grass always being greener may sound like a good thing, but this saying may not always be true. The grass around your septic system can give you a clue as to the condition of your septic system’s health. Bright green grass in your yard may indicate a leak or early failure of your septic system’s drainfield. This could be the first indication to call FloHawks for a septic system inspection.   WHAT’S GOING ON IN MY DRAINFIELD? What’s Going On In My Drainfield? Your drainfield is an important part of your septic system. Once wastewater effluent leaves your septic...

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What’s That “Rotten Egg” Smell?

June 18, 2021

A sewer gas odor can come from your household septic system or the sanitary sewer system. If you notice a foul smell that is causing a problem in your home, it may be sewer gas. WHAT IS SEWER GAS? Septic StenchSewer gas is a complex mixture of toxic and non-toxic gasses that can be present at varying levels depending upon the source. It is formed during the decay of household waste, typically the anaerobic decomposition of sewage and sludge. Sewer gas is mostly methane, which is odorless, but it’s almost always mixed with other gasses, the most common being hydrogen...

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Bacterial Breakdown in Septic Tanks

February 19, 2021

Life inside your septic tank is a carefully maintained of billions of naturally occurring microscopic critters living in a septic system, allowing it to work properly. For bacteria activity to occur, a septic tank should have a temperature above 40 degrees F. Bacteria, which are naturally present in all septic systems, digest the solids that have settled to the bottom of the tank and begin the decomposition process. A septic tank will usually have a pH between 6 and 7.5. How Bacteria Work The trillions of naturally occurring bacteria that thrive inside a septic system play a major part in...

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What Are Grease Traps?

February 5, 2021

As their name implies, grease traps are designed specifically to trap fats, oils, or grease (FOG) before they can go down the drain and enter the public sewer line. Left unchecked, FOG can solidify and stick to the insides of pipes, trapping small pieces of food debris and other items. Over time, this solid mass can continue to grow until it clogs the sewer lines and causes all kinds of destruction in the sewer system including sewage backup. The easiest way to solve this problem is to use a grease trap and prevent FOG from ever entering the sewer system....

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How Do Storms Impact Your Septic System?

January 8, 2021

After heavy rain, septic problems can be common. Significant rainfall can quickly flood the ground around the soil absorption area (drainfield) leaving it saturated and making it impossible for water to flow out of your septic system. With nowhere to go, the water eventually travels backward through the plumbing system and back into drains and toilets and into your home. A flooded drainfield can also lead to untreated sewage flowing into the groundwater and local streams, putting them at risk for significant environmental contamination. What can you do to minimize your risk? FloHawks has a few simple tips to share...

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4 Things to Do When Your Septic System Floods

November 6, 2020

Earlier this year, we talked about some of the reasons why your drain field might flood. As we get into the rainy season, it is important to know what to do if your drain field does flood. Here are four things you should do if your septic system floods this winter. 1. Stop Running Water Through Your Pipes Until the water in the drain field has absorbed back into the ground, do not use your septic system. Running more water through your pipes will only increase the water level and add to the flooding. 2. Have Your Septic Tank Inspected...

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10 Worst Trees for Septic Systems

October 26, 2020

Trees add beauty, shade and value to your Tacoma, WA, property. However, their roots often cause problems for a home’s plumbing system. If you’re thinking about planting a new tree on your property, these are the 10 worst ones for your home’s septic system. 1. Willows Willow trees are tall and wide. As such, they need a large root system. Their roots are known to spread far and wide in search of moisture. 2. Beech Beeches are known for their longevity and height. They’re also known for shallow roots that grow vigorously. If you cut down a beech, its roots...

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